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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Ashley Webster
Business News Journalist for the Fox Business Network
FBC 08/13/2014
Webster: The former NSA contractor gave a new interview to “Wired” magazine which features him on the cover embracing an American flag. Among the new revelations Snowden claims the NSA was responsible for a 2012 internet outage in Syria. And the NSA has a top-secret program called MonsterMind that can conduct and respond to cyber attacks automatically.
Edward Snowden
Whistleblower
MSNBCW 08/13/2014
Snowden: My name is Ed Snowden. I used to work for the government and now I work for the public. Geist: In front of the flash bulbs. Appearing at times exhausted, at times defiant. wearing a bouncer's t-shirt. Geist: Did you feel like he took a different tact in making this a little more about himself than he has previously. Dadich: He came in quite nervous to the shoot and said I love my count country, I feel like a patriot. It was at that moment we knew we had the cover. Geist: Jim Bamford had unprecedented access, recently spending three days with Snowden in Moscow.
Edward Snowden
Whistleblower
MSNBCW 08/13/2014
Geist: Snowden told "wired" of a top secret program called MonsterMind, first revealed here, which automatically retaliates to cyber attacks from foreign countries. Bamford: And if you just turn around and automatically fire back, you may be starting an accidental war. Geist: Wired released new audio recordings of its time with Snowden. Snowden: Our generation is facing a time where governments around the world are questioning whether or not individuals can be trusted with the power of technology. And while I don't know the answer to that question, what I do know is that governments shouldn't be the ones to decide. We should. Geist: Snowden disputes that he took 1.7 million documents as the government alleges, saying the number is much smaller and he wouldn't comment on recent reports that he has inspired other leakers.
Edward Snowden
Whistleblower
MSNBCW 08/13/2014
Bamford: There is another Snowden out there someplace. The question is whether he's still in there, whether he's out, whether NSA is looking for him. Geist: Snowden says he left a trail of digital bread crumbs to show the NSA exactly what he took from an internal server, but the NSA missed the clues. Snowden: “I figured they would have a hard time,” Snowden told "wired." “I didn't figure they would be completely incapable. “ Bamford: He had access to material well beyond top secret. Way over most anybody's head at NSA. Snowden: I gave this information back to public hands to give you back a choice about the country you want to live in. Geist: Snowden told "Wired" he wants to come home and he would even he says volunteer for prison as long as it served the right purpose. For its part the NSA told us if Mr. Snowden wants to discuss his activities, that conversation should be held with the U.S. Department of Justice. He needs to return to the United States to face the charges against him.
James Bamford
Author and Journalist, Writer for Wired
WHYY 08/13/2014
Bamford: He said he actually left basically bread crumbs. He left some clues to indicate which documents he actually saw and which documents he actually copied so that the N.S.A., when they went back and did an audit, would be able to determine that he was a whistleblower -- in other words, taking documents that indicated they were involved in domestic eavesdropping, for example, as opposed to documents dealing with North Korea or Russia or china or whatever. So he didn't say how many documents, but he said there were considerably fewer than the 1.7 million that the N.S.A. has alleged, and that 1.7 million is basically based on the documents he may have at one point seen, but certainly not the documents that he copied and by them missing the clues he left, we aren't able to tell which he saw and which he copied.
James Bamford
Author and Journalist, Writer for Wired
WHYY 08/13/2014
Bamford: What Edward Snowden said to me was that the N.S.A. certainly has a problem, that things are still going walking. He said that's a major problem to the U.S. since the N.S.A. has so much of American communications -- telephone calls, e-mails and so forth -- and if there is a second leaker, which apparently there is, and certainly the evidence indicates that, and maybe having been inspired by Edward Snowden, it's certainly a major problem for N.S.A., if they thought they had a problem with Snowden, now they have a problem with someone else there.
James Bamford
Author and Journalist, Writer for Wired
WHYY 08/13/2014
Bamford: yeah, he was quite concerned that at some point the information that was coming out will pretty much be put on the back pages, people won't pay attention to it anymore, sort of compare it to a war in the sense that five people being killed is a headline, 1,000 people being killed a month later is a back page. So it's a problem of becoming sort of numbed, or this whole problem of boiling frogs where a frog is in the water and the heat gets turned up slowly so that the frog doesn't know is it’s being boiled. So it's a problem he's concerned about that the public will stop paying attention to the leaks and revelations at some point.
Myron Belkind
National Press Club President; Former AP Foreign Correspondent & Bureau Chief
CSPAN 08/14/2014
Belkind: Also unacceptable is the threat the prison being faced by James Risen of The New York Times because of his work as a professional journalist. This morning a petition signed by more than 100,000 persons was delivered to the Department of Justice declaring “We support James Risen because we support a free press.” Those petitioners significantly include 20 Pulitzer Prize winners who declared their support for Mr. Risen, who is refusing to name a source for information about a bungled CIA operation in Iran that appeared in his 2006 book
Myron Belkind
National Press Club President; Former AP Foreign Correspondent & Bureau Chief
CSPAN 08/14/2014
Belkind: Also unacceptable is the threat the prison being faced by James Risen of The New York Times because of his work as a professional journalist. This morning a petition signed by more than 100,000 persons was delivered to the Department of Justice declaring “We support James Risen because we support a free press.” Those petitioners significantly include 20 Pulitzer Prize winners who declared their support for Mr. Risen, who is refusing to name a source for information about a bungled CIA operation in Iran that appeared in his 2006 book
Myron Belkind
National Press Club President; Former AP Foreign Correspondent & Bureau Chief
CSPAN 08/14/2014
Belkind: The National Press Club presented Mr. Risen it’s domestic Freedom of the Press Award in 2012 for a career of reporting material the government would prefer to keep from public view. From warrantless surveillance to the botched program to give Iran flawed nuclear weapons designs and he was also honored for resisting government attempts to get him to reveal his confidential sources. I am proud that The National Press Club, through its act of Freedom of the Press Committee, under the leadership of John Donnelly has continued to support Mr. Risen, as well as today's petition.
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